may 3, 1889

Ed Hannaford had a narrow escape Thursday morning. In trying to get off a moving train, which landed him on his face instead of his feet, resulted in several ugly bruises.

J.M. Wishart and family have removed to Topeka, where they will reside hereafter. Mr. Wishart’s business is increasing and he believes Topeka is a more central location from which to work.

One hundred robust Sioux braves have left for France to attend the Paris Exposition. The usual inquiry of parlez-vous Francais will be met with “Ugh!” One particular feature is that the company has a No Neck, a Medicine Horse, a Rocky Bear, and a Red Shirt — the names of four principal chiefs.

It is quite possible that the three frosts this week, especially that of this Friday morning, which formed considerable ice, has resulted in serious damage in some localities to the fruit, especially grapes and pears, yet it is hoped that enough has escaped to still give us an abundant fruit crop.

It would be a good idea for the City Marshal to see that the alleys about town are cleaned up before warm weather sets in. There are several alleys on the hill almost completely obstructed by manure heaps, and in the valley, the alleys in the rear of lots fronting Main street are in a fearful condition.

 

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