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LETTERS: Resigning chief

To the editor:

For the past 4½ years, I have served the City of Marion as the Chief of Police and have truly enjoyed my time in this capacity. It is with mixed emotions that I resign this position, but feel that it is time for me and my family to move forward into the next chapter of our lives.

I feel honored to have worked for you to make our community a better place for everyone. I am grateful for the experiences and memories that I will carry with me into future endeavors. I want to thank you for this opportunity and for accepting me as a part of the community.

Although I am nervous about leaving and taking on new challenges in my life, I am certain that the Police Department will be in capable hands with Tyler Mermis, Clinton Jeffrey, Brad Cady, Tiffany Christensen and the multitude of part-time help that keeps it running smoothly. Tyler is a fair and honest man who loves serving the City of Marion. I have no doubt that he will continue to work for this community with its best interest in his heart. Clinton and Brad are both excellent officers and our community is blessed to have them patrolling the streets, you are all in great hands!

Although my family and I are excited for our future adventures, we are sad to see our time here expire. Clark and I are glad that we started our journey here as it is a great place for young people to develop and grow. My children, like my wife and I, have developed strong bonds with classmates and the community making the transition even tougher, although I’m sure they will be fine. We will all be stronger and better people for our time spent here.

Thank you for allowing us to be a part of your lives and for being a part of ours. Thank you to all of you who played a part in me becoming the man I have become. May God bless you all and continue to bless this community.

Josh Whitwell
Marion Police Chief

Community squandered chance to support local businesses

To the editor:

Today I received my Marion County Record. On the back were people and their pictures. Their comments as to what this town needs, the main complaint was we have no businesses!

I came to Marion in October 1951, after the flood. At that time, there were a number of car agencies, Ford, Chevy, Olds, Buick, Pontiac, and Dodge.

Then there were appliance stores, GE, RCA, Firestone, Westinghouse, Maytag, Western Auto, Gamble’s, Norge, and Zenith. Five restaurants, two shoe stores, three clothing stores, four grocery stores, and approximately 14 gas stations. All of them were paying taxes. With them gone, you are making up the difference. It is not going to improve, I feel.

As one dealer told me when he got a new truck, some customers quit him because they thought he was getting rich. People never figured out these businesses were taking on a big amount of the taxes.

Customers went to Gem’s, David’s, and Walmart — these did not pay any of your taxes. The result is Main Street dried up. So we whine, cry, and wring our hands, not willing to admit those “cheap” trips cut our own throats.

John Britain, Marion

Roundabouts create as many problems as they solve

To the editor:

The proposed roundabout at the junction of highways 150 and 77 might solve one cause of accidents but could create other problems.

In the years 2010 and 2011, very long, wide tanks, manufactured on the east side of Emporia, came through that intersection on the way to McPherson. My son, Dale, and I had to park on the shoulder while one of those tanks used both lanes of K-150 to pass by. The tank and truck pulling it could never circle a roundabout.

A few years ago a roundabout was installed on the west edge of Emporia. There have been accidents on it. My sister avoids it. Her daughter and husband were in England a few years back. She said England was removing roundabouts because of traffic problems.

I have seen a woman driving a car while talking on a cell phone and eating an ice cream cone! Let us drive defensively, watch other vehicles, yield, and be courteous.

Mary Clemmer, Tampa

Last modified Jan. 5, 2012

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