HEADLINES

  • Woman leads police on multi-county chase

    A Wichita woman was arrested Tuesday after leading police more than 29 miles from Hillsboro to north of Walton. The chase started at 11:10 a.m. as she drove between Hillsboro and eastern Harvey County.

  • Novak turns over computer for open records request

    Marion County commissioner Dianne Novak is temporarily without her county-owned computer while an open records request related to a lawsuit is being dealt with. Expedition Wind, a company working to develop a wind farm in the southern portion of Marion County, on April 22 filed an open records request seeking all of Novak’s records requests, emails in both county and non-county accounts, and correspondence including text messages from Novak that relate to land use, zoning, wind energy, Expedition Wind, Doyle or Stonebridge projects, that Novak wrote in her capacity as commissioner from Feb. 1, 2019 until April 22.

  • Hillsboro hires new city administrator

    Goessel resident Matt Stiles will begin duties as Hillsboro city administrator June 15. The timing will give him two weeks to work with retiring city administrator of 12 years Larry Paine, whose last day on the job will be June 30.

  • State partially opens; courthouse to stay closed

    Governor Laura Kelly on Thursday announced her plan to reopen the state of Kansas in three phases and county commissioners on Monday approved two county health department stipulations to encourage social distancing. The first is that self-service of unpackaged food such as salad bars and buffets is not allowed, and door-to-door business solicitation is not permitted.

  • Man arrested on suspicion of domestic battery

    Erick L. Campbell, 39, Lost Springs, was arrested on suspicion of aggravated domestic battery Monday on 350th Rd. near Vista Rd. for striking the victim multiple times, according to scanner reports. No weapons or alcohol were involved, but the victim had been punched in the head, she said when calling in at 4:38 p.m.

  • Work on Main St. milling, overlaying underway

    Work on milling and overlaying Marion Main St. from 1st St. to the west city limit, begun Tuesday, is expected to last five days. During the milling and overlay processes, traffic on the road will be limited to one lane of traffic.

  • Graduating seniors skeptical of college housing prospects

    Marion senior Cassie Meyer’s college of choice hasn’t wavered in the face of distance learning or COVID-19, but she is still wondering where she will live this fall. While she plans to attend Kansas State University, Meyer doesn’t know if she’ll be able to stay on campus.

COUNTY

  • Hardware store opens in Peabody

    Inventory is still trickling in, but Jamie and Korie Hatton decided they had worked too hard to be thrown by setbacks as they opened Hatton’s Hometown Hardware this past week. The couple spent months renovating the space at 124 N. Walnut St. in Peabody where a hardware store has stood since the late 1870s.

  • Marion council eyes budget

    Marion city council members Monday began looking at budget priorities for the coming fiscal year with a review of the ways the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting revenue. City administrator Roger Holter said city utility revenues saw a large drop for commercial electricity use, which was offset by an increase in residential electricity use.

  • Florence approves plan for employees

    Florence city council made a commitment to city employees Monday, approving a plan to pay employees’ salaries if they contract COVID-19 or another pandemic in the future. “It’s a good thing for the employees,” councilman Matt Williams said. “It shows our employees that we’re looking after them.”

  • Bridge over dam at reservoir to close again for repairs

    A portion of Old Mill Rd. that runs across the dam at Marion Reservoir will close for repairs to 50-year-old supports of the new bridge’s deck. Pawnee Rd. will serve as an alternate route to the reservoir during repairs, which are expected to take about four months, assistant lake manager Kevin McCoy said.

  • Hillsboro residents urged to work out utility bill agreements

    The City of Hillsboro is extending its utility shutoff date in anticipation of the expiration of the governor’s executive order prohibiting shutting off utility customers for non-payment of their utility bills until June 15. Customers delinquent on their utility bill are urged to contact Mona Hein at Hillsboro City Hall to work out a payment plan.

  • County lake reopens to visitors, camping

    The number of visitors who have flocked to Marion County Park and Lake are more typical of mid-summer as its campgrounds and docks reopen to visitors, lake superintendent Isaac Hett said. Temperatures in the 80s made this past weekend seem “like a typical June day” rather than early May, judging by the number of boats, he said, adding that most visitors kept their distance as they fished.

OTHER NEWS

  • Marion trucker interviewed for LA Times feature

    Marion resident Kim Kline, a truck driver for Metro Express in Wichita, was recently interviewed for a Los Angeles Times story about challenges faced by truck drivers working through the COVID-19 pandemic. Kline was stopped at a Stillwater, Oklahoma, truck stop on a trip to deliver flour to a Walmart when he was interviewed.

  • County libraries to stay closed for now

    Libraries are allowed to reopen under phase one of governor Laura Kelly’s plan for the state, but Marion county libraries are in no rush. “I don’t think they thought it through very well,” said Janet Marler, director of Marion’s city library. “Books hold a lot of germs and a lot of people handle them.”

  • Musicians search for alternative venues

    After playing at last year’s Chingawassa Days, Marion musician Dylan Delk was looking forward to this year’s event. He planned to have songs recorded for promotion, but lost that opportunity when the annual affair was canceled.

  • Marion blood drive coming in May

    An American Red Cross blood drive is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. May 11 at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 320 S. Cedar, Marion. Donors are required to wear a face covering or mask while at the drive, in alignment with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention public guidance.

  • Let the show go on

    Despite social distancing requirements that seemingly would have killed Centre school’s annual Artful Eye show for students in grades three through five, the words of the song, “The Show Must Go On,” spring to mind. In this case, the show must go online.

  • Marion FFA receives donation for greenhouse

    Marion FFA received a $475 donation this week toward a proposed greenhouse project at Marion High School. The donation was made by Jayson Hanschu Agency Inc. and American Family Insurance.

DEATHS

  • Alda Hiebert

    A private graveside servicefor Alda Mae Hiebert, 84, who died May 1, 2020, at Bethesda home in Goessel, will be at Alexanderwohl Cemetery, rural Goessel. A public service will be at a later date.

  • Steven Walker

    Private family services to be held at a later date for Steven E. Walker, 67, of Peabody, who died April 27 at Harry Hynes Memorial Hospice in Wichita. He was born Sept. 13, 1952, in Herington, the son of Wallace and Elenora Walker.

  • IN MEMORIAM:

    Fred Epperson

DOCKET

FINANCE

  • Counterfeit bills range from ordinary to outlandish

    Creating counterfeit bills is usually about making the fake money as real as possible, but sometimes the attempts can border on being outlandish, said Hillsboro police chief Dan Kinning. Someone once taped a $20 bill’s number and serial number onto a $1 bill, Kinning said.

  • Stock, bond investments under rapid shift

    Now is an uncertain time for stock and bond investments, with markets having plunged the first quarter of the year. Financial advisers, though, are encouraging clients to think before making major changes to their accounts.

OPINION

  • Learning hard-taught lessons of COVID-19

    Tuesday was the last day of class for 26 college students, mainly graduating seniors. Attendance was optional — a time for getting answers to lingering questions about a final project due a week and a half later. Student Meghan Rest had no questions. But she showed up for class anyway. It wasn’t a particular burden. Instead of having to dress, trek across campus, and plop down in an uncomfortable chair in a cramped seminar room, she was able to rear-up from her bed two minutes before class, grab her laptop, and teleconference with a professor relocated to Marion, Kansas, two states removed from her hometown near Peoria.

  • Taking a pop at our chained-up economy

    Tuesday was the last day of class for 26 college students, mainly graduating seniors. Attendance was optional — a time for getting answers to lingering questions about a final project due a week and a half later. Student Meghan Rest had no questions. But she showed up for class anyway. It wasn’t a particular burden. Instead of having to dress, trek across campus, and plop down in an uncomfortable chair in a cramped seminar room, she was able to rear-up from her bed two minutes before class, grab her laptop, and teleconference with a professor relocated to Marion, Kansas, two states removed from her hometown near Peoria.

  • ANOTHER DAY IN THE COUNTRY:

    The Red Bag
  • LETTER TO THE EDITOR:

    Give me liberty

PEOPLE

MORE…

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